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LSAT Syllabus 2017

LSAT Syllabus is set by Law School Admission Council (LSAC). The law entrance exam is conducted 4 times every year. Candidates seeking admissions in programs like LLM and JD have to qualify LSAT. Law School Admission Test (LSAT) 2017-18 is a standardized examination, to be given by students who are seeking admission into law colleges across the world.

  • LSAT 2017-18 is conducted by Law School Admission Council (LSAC), which is a USA-based non-profit corporation, offering distinctive, modern products and services to make admission process easier for both law schools and applicants worldwide.
  • Exam is administered four times every year across five segregated regions, starting from the month of June and then subsequently in September/October, December, and February
  • Examination dates will vary across five regions namely United States, Canada, and the Caribbean; Australia and New Zealand; Europe, Middle East, and Africa; Asia; South America, Central America, and Mexico
  • Syllabus for exam is intended towards assessing candidates on international law schools’ standards. Exam will evaluate capabilities of applicants in areas deemed significant to achieve success at law schools
  • Syllabus follows the set pattern of the world-distinguished LSAT. Exam is formulated by testing professionals, who possess advanced degrees in psychometrics, English, linguistics and logic.
  • Examination pattern comprises one reading comprehension section, one analytical reasoning section and two logical reasoning sections, along with a writing test at the end of examination
  • All sections, including the writing section, are of 35 minutes each
  • A total of 96-108 multiple choice questions (MCQs) have to be answered by candidates, with each section consisting of 24 or 25 MCQs
  • There are either 4 or 5 answer choices for every MCQ
  • A break of 15 minutes is given to candidates between the two sections of logical reasoning

Examination Dates For LSAT 2017-18

  1. United States, Canada, and the Caribbean
  • Monday, June 12, 2017
  • Saturday, September 16, 2017
  • Monday, September 18, 2017 (Saturday Sabbath Observers only)
  • Saturday, November 18, 2017 (Spanish LSAT only)
  • Saturday, December 2, 2017
  • Monday, December 4, 2017 (Saturday Sabbath Observers only)
  • Saturday, February 10, 2018 (non-disclosed test)
  • Monday, February 12, 2018 (Saturday Sabbath Observers only)
  1. Australia and New Zealand
  • Sunday, 25 June 2017
  • Sunday, 17 September 2017
  • Sunday, 3 December 2017
  • Sunday, 11 February 2018
  1. Europe, Middle East, and Africa
  • Tuesday, June 13, 2017
  • Saturday, September 16, 2017
  • Monday, September 18, 2017 (Saturday Sabbath Observers only)
  • Saturday, December 2, 2017
  • Monday, December 4, 2017 (Saturday Sabbath Observers only)
  • Saturday, February 10, 2018
  • Monday, February 12, 2018 (Saturday Sabbath Observers only)
  1. Asia
  • Sunday, June 25, 2017
  • Sunday, September 17, 2017
  • Sunday, December 3, 2017
  • Sunday, February 11, 2018
  1. South America, Central America, and Mexico
  • Monday, June 12, 2017
  • Saturday, September 16, 2017
  • Monday, September 18, 2017 (Saturday Sabbath Observers only)
  • Saturday, December 2, 2017
  • Monday, December 4, 2017 (Saturday Sabbath Observers only)
  • Saturday, February 10, 2018
  • Monday, February 12, 2018 (Saturday Sabbath Observers only)

Subject Wise Syllabus

Syllabus for LSAT 2017-18 entails extracting opposite implications from given texts to arrive at accurate understanding of texts. This will require indulging in crucial thought process and examine arguments and their solutions.

LSAT Syllabus for Reading Comprehension Section

This section is aimed at evaluating the skills of candidates pertaining to reading, coupled with decisive understanding and insight. The section involves extensive and intricate text materials that are in line with what students will have to study at law schools.

These questions will require candidates to indulge in complex analysis that a law student is generally required to carry out in the process of solving issues.

  • This section entails four sets of questions.
  • Each set comprises a range of reading texts that are required to be assessed by candidates
  • Text in three sets consists of a single reading passage, while the fourth comprises two associated shorter passages. Sets with two passages are a modified version of Reading Comprehension, known as Comparative Reading,
  • Texts are then followed by questions ranging from five to eight
  • These questions are designed to examine the reasoning capabilities of candidates
  • The total of questions asked in this section range approximately between 26 and 28
  • Candidates are given 35 minutes to complete this section

Sample Questions

Directions - Each set of questions in this section is based on a single passage or a pair of passages. The questions are to be answered on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage or pair of passages. For some of the questions, more than one of the choices could conceivably answer the question. However, you are to choose the best answer; that is, the response that most accurately and completely answers the question, and blacken the corresponding space on your answer sheet.

Passage for Questions 1, 2, and 3

The painter Roy Lichtenstein helped to define pop art—the movement that incorporated commonplace objects and commercial-art techniques into paintings—by paraphrasing the style of comic books in his work. His merger of a popular genre with the forms and intentions of fine art generated a complex result: while poking fun at the pretensions of the art world, Lichtenstein’s work also managed to convey a seriousness of theme that enabled it to transcend mere parody.

That Lichtenstein’s images were fine art was at first difficult to see, because, with their word balloons and highly stylized figures, they looked like nothing more than the comic book panels from which they were copied. Standard art history holds that pop art emerged as an impersonal alternative to the histrionics of abstract expressionism, a movement in which painters conveyed their private attitudes and emotions using nonrepresentational techniques. The truth is that by the time pop art first appeared in the early 1960s, abstract expressionism had already lost much of its force. Pop art painters weren’t quarreling with the powerful early abstract expressionist work of the late 1940s but with a second generation of abstract expressionists whose work seemed airy, high-minded, and overly lyrical. Pop art paintings were full of simple black lines and large areas of primary color. Lichtenstein’s work was part of a general rebellion against the fading emotional power of abstract expressionism, rather than an aloof attempt to ignore it.

But if rebellion against previous art by means of the careful imitation of a popular genre were all that characterized Lichtenstein’s work, it would possess only the reflective power that parodies have in relation to their subjects. Beneath its cartoonish methods, his work displayed an impulse toward realism, an urge to say that what was missing from contemporary painting was the depiction of contemporary life. The stilted romances and war stories portrayed in the comic books on which he based his canvases, the stylized automobiles, hot dogs, and table lamps that appeared in his pictures, were reflections of the culture Lichtenstein inhabited. But, in contrast to some pop art, Lichtenstein’s work exuded not a jaded cynicism about consumer culture, but a kind of deliberate naivete, intended as a response to the excess of sophistication he observed not only in the later abstract expressionists but in some other pop artists. With the comics—typically the domain of youth and innocence—as his reference point, a nostalgia fills his paintings that gives them, for all their surface bravado, an inner sweetness. His persistent use of comic-art conventions demonstrates a faith in reconciliation, not only between cartoons and fine art, but between parody and true feeling.

Question 1

Which one of the following best captures the author’s attitude toward Lichtenstein’s work?

  1. enthusiasm for its more rebellious aspects
  2. respect for its successful parody of youth and innocence
  3. pleasure in its blatant rejection of abstract expressionism
  4. admiration for its subtle critique of contemporary culture
  5. appreciation for its ability to incorporate both realism and naivete

Question 2

The author most likely lists some of the themes and objects influencing and appearing in Lichtenstein’s paintings (middle of the last paragraph) primarily to

  1. show that the paintings depict aspects of contemporary life
  2. support the claim that Lichtenstein’s work was parodic in intent
  3. contrast Lichtenstein’s approach to art with that of abstract expressionism
  4. suggest the emotions that lie at the heart of Lichtenstein’s work
  5. endorse Lichtenstein’s attitude toward consumer culture

Question 3

The primary purpose of the passage is most likely to

  1. express curiosity about an artist’s work
  2. clarify the motivation behind an artist’s work
  3. contrast two opposing theories about an artist’s work
  4. describe the evolution of an artist’s work
  5. refute a previous overestimation of an artist’s work

Preparation Tips

Candidates should not get discouraged in case the content of reading selections seems unfamiliar because texts are picked up from several disciplines and sources.

  • Questions must specifically be answered on the basis of text content
  • Attempt easier sets first and leave tough or unfamiliar ones for later
  • Closely and carefully read the text before answering
  • First read questions, then the text and finally come back to questions
  • Candidate can choose to first quickly read the text and questions and subsequently read the selection closely before answering the questions
  • Experiment with strategies while preparing for exam to arrive at the most effective strategy
  • Candidates must keep in mind that effectiveness of strategies might differ under timed conditions

LSAT Syllabus for Analytical Reasoning Section

This section is aimed at evaluating candidate’s aptitude towards considering a set of facts and rules and on their basis determining what could or must be true. Questions asked in this section are associated with testing candidate’s ability towards understanding the structure of relationships and subsequently bring out logical conclusions concerning these structures.

Candidate must possess the ability to reason with verifiable set of rules and principles, which express relationships between people, things or occurrences.

  • Questions are framed in sets and each set is based on one passage
  • Each passage explains either ordering relationships or grouping relationships or even a combination of both
  • Questions are developed to assess several deductive reasoning abilities like
  • understanding the fundamental composition of a set of relationships by finding a comprehensive resolution for problem
  • Analyzing using conditional statements and identifying rationally equivalent formulations of these statements
  • Deducing from given facts and rules, as to what could or must be true
  • Deducing from both given facts and rules as well new information from additional or substitute fact or rule, as to what could or must be true
  • Identifying logical equivalency between two statements
  • The total of questions asked in this section range approximately between 22 and 24
  • Candidates are given 35 minutes to complete this section

Knowledge, skills and reasoning ability must be used by college students and graduates to answer the questions

Sample Questions

Directions - Each group of questions in this section is based on a set of conditions. In answering some of the questions, it may be useful to draw a rough diagram. Choose the response that most accurately and completely answers the question and blacken the corresponding space on your answer sheet.

Passage for Question 1

A university library budget committee must reduce exactly five of eight areas of expenditure—G, L, M, N, P, R, S, and W—in accordance with the following conditions:

    If both G and S are reduced, W is also reduced.

    If N is reduced, neither R nor S is reduced.

    If P is reduced, L is not reduced.

    Of the three areas L, M, and R, exactly two are reduced.

Question 1

If both M and R are reduced, which one of the following is a pair of areas neither of which could be reduced?

  1. G, L
  2. G, N
  3. L, N
  4. L, P
  5. P, S

Passage for Questions 2 and 3

Seven piano students—T, U, V, W, X, Y, and Z—are to give a recital, and their instructor is deciding the order in which they will perform. Each student will play exactly one piece, a piano solo. In deciding the order of performance, the instructor must observe the following restrictions:

    X cannot play first or second.

    W cannot play until X has played.

    Neither T nor Y can play seventh.

    Either Y or Z must play immediately after W plays.

    V must play either immediately after or immediately before U plays.

Question 2

If V plays first, which one of the following must be true?

  1. T plays sixth.
  2. X plays third.
  3. Z plays seventh.
  4. T plays immediately after Y.
  5. W plays immediately after X.

Question 3

If U plays third, what is the latest position in which Y can play?

  1. first
  2. second
  3. fifth
  4. sixth
  5. seventh

Preparation Tips

Candidates should usually avoid leaving a passage incomplete before starting next passage because it will lead to time wastage. However, it might be sensible to leave the passage if it is consuming too much time.

  • It might be preferable to first attempt those passages that seem simpler than others
  • Return to difficult passages in end
  • Finish one passage before starting next
  • Question of a long or difficult looking passage might not necessarily be tough
  • Passages to be read and analyzed carefully to understand nature of relationships precisely
  • Do not establish unwarranted assumptions, while reading conditions
  • Conditions are formulated in the most possible clear manner and are not tricky
  • Read conditions in obvious and precise sense
  • Each question must be solved independently
  • Highlighting key text and using diagrams will be helpful in evaluating problems
  • Trying out various types of during preparation will help in finding the most effective diagram
  • All candidates might not find diagrams useful

LSAT Syllabus for Logical Reasoning Section

This section is aimed at assessing the candidate’s capabilities to examine, decisively assess and complete arguments. 

  • Questions are designed on the basis of short arguments, selected from various sources like newspapers, general interest magazines etc.
  • These arguments reflect legal reasoning in the types of arguments presented and in their complexity
  • Each question needs reading and comprehending of a short passage
  • Subsequently, 1 (or 2 rarely) question is asked and are formulated to evaluate various critical thinking abilities (specifically abilities necessary for legal reasoning) like
  • Identifying segments of an argument and their relationships
  • Identifying resemblances and differentiations between patterns of reasoning
  • Arriving at conclusions, supported with facts
  • Interpretation through analogy
  • Identifying areas of disagreement and misapprehensions
  • Assessing the impact of additional evidence on argument
  • Discovering assumptions made by specific arguments
  • Recognizing and applying principles or rules
  • Recognizing errors in arguments
  • Recognizing explanations
  • No specialized knowledge of logical terms is required to attempt this section

Sample Questions

Directions - The questions in this section are based on the reasoning contained in brief statements or passages. For some questions, more than one of the choices could conceivably answer the question. However, you are to choose the best answer; that is, the response that most accurately and completely answers the question. You should not make assumptions that are by commonsense standards implausible, superfluous, or incompatible with the passage. After you have chosen the best answer, blacken the corresponding space on your answer sheet.

Question 1

Laird: Pure research provides us with new technologies that contribute to saving lives. Even more worthwhile than this, however, is its role in expanding our knowledge and providing new, unexplored ideas.

Kim: Your priorities are mistaken. Saving lives is what counts most of all. Without pure research, medicine would not be as advanced as it is.

Laird and Kim disagree on whether pure research

  1. derives its significance in part from its providing new technologies
  2. expands the boundaries of our knowledge of medicine
  3. should have the saving of human lives as an important goal
  4. has its most valuable achievements in medical applications
  5. has any value apart from its role in providing new technologies to save lives

Question 2

Executive: We recently ran a set of advertisements in the print version of a travel magazine and on that magazine’s website. We were unable to get any direct information about consumer response to the print ads. However, we found that consumer response to the ads on the website was much more limited than is typical for website ads. We concluded that consumer response to the print ads was probably below par as well.

The executive’s reasoning does which one of the following?      

  1. bases a prediction of the intensity of a phenomenon on information about the intensity of that phenomenon’s cause
  2. uses information about the typical frequency of events of a general kind to draw a conclusion about the probability of a particular event of that kind
  3. infers a statistical generalization from claims about a large number of specific instances
  4. uses a case in which direct evidence is available to draw a conclusion about an analogous case in which direct evidence is unavailable
  5. bases a prediction about future events on facts about recent comparable events

Preparation Tips

  • Ensure understanding of each section of question and every answer option
  • Do not select the answer option on the basis of statement being true
  • Question to be answered solely on the basis of information given, despite your agreement
  • No hidden meanings or tricks are involved

Recommended Books

Name of the BookPublisher/AuthorScreenshot
The Next 10 Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests 42–51™LSAC
LSAT BOOK
The Official LSAT PrepTests ®LSAC
LSAT BOOK
10 Actual Official LSAT PrepTests Volume V™LSAC
LSAT BOOK
The Official LSAT SuperPrep®LSAC
LSAT BOOK
The Official LSAT SuperPrep II™LSAC
LSAT BOOK
LSAT ItemWise®—Online LSAT familiarization toolLSAC
LSAT BOOK

Marking Scheme

  • No negative marking
  • Students are given marks on each question individually
  • Candidate’s score can range from 120 to 180

Brief about Exam Pattern

The general exam pattern of LSAT 2017-18 will be same for all the five segregated regions. The pattern will involve one section on reading comprehension, one section on analytical reasoning, two sections on logical reasoning sections, along with a writing test at the end of examination.

The writing test will not be included in the score. However, this written piece will be sent to all law colleges in which candidates apply.   

SECTIONNUMBER OF QUESTIONSTIME ALLOWED
Analytical Reasoning26-28 (approximately)35 minutes
1st Logical Reasoning22-24 (approximately)35 minutes
2nd Logical Reasoning24-28 (approximately)35 minutes
Reading Comprehension24-28 (approximately)35 minutes

GET MORE INFO

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